Project 5 – The Manipulated Image

Exercise

Instead of using double exposures or printing from double negatives we now have the technology available to us to make these changes in post-production, allowing for quite astonishing results.

Use digital software such as Photoshop to create a composite image which visually appears to be a documentary photograph but which could never actually be.

To make a composite image you need to consider your idea and make the required amount of images to join together.

Upload the images and decide which image you’ll use as your main image and background. Use the magic wand to select sections of image from the others you wish to move into your background image. Copy via layer and drag into the background. Do this repeatedly until you have all the pieces of your puzzle in place. In order to make it more convincing, use the erase tool on each layer to keep the edges soft and to create a better illusion. Be aware of perspective and light and shadows for the most effective results.

Search YouTube for Photoshop tutorials; there will probably be a suitable upload. If not, ask your tutor or your fellow students for advice or find a digital technique book in your library for more specific instructions.

Have a look at Peter Kennard’s Photo Op series for inspiration:

www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/oct/15/tony-blair-selfie-photo-op- imperial-war-museum [accessed 24/02/14

My Result:

I decided to use a few of the photos I recently took on a visit to Rome and combine parts of them to create a false landscape scene.

Photoshop isn’t something I am used to using so this took me a little time to work my way around it and figure things out, but it was a useful learning exercise and I am sure I will now attempt to use it more in the future. I certainly need to improve my skills and my patience level with it too!

Individual Images

Here are the images I combined to create the result above.